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CCSRE Life Stories: Jacqueline Davies

Learn more about the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity  at Middlebury College

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In her interview, Jackie Davies shares her journey from a one room school house in Vermont to California and back to Vermont; her experience as an outsider due to moving to California, poverty, and limited opportunities for enriching experiences. Now her work has come full circle as Student Services Director, which is much more than financial aid forms – she has an intuitive way of working with individual students and families that is personal and direct.

 

People

Jackie Davies, Student Services Director

Dana Yeaton, Interviewer

 

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A MiddLab Project

CCSRE Life Stories: Larry Yarbrough

Learn more about the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Middlebury College.

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In his interview, Larry Yarbrough talks about growing up in Alabama and the culture shock he experienced when he began teaching at Middlebury College over thirty years ago.  He remarks on the secular nature of life here, the never-ending opportunities to learn about other religions and cultures, his experience of racial and socioeconomic diversity, how religion is an integral part of his life, making him different from most of his colleagues, how traveling to the Middle East and chairing the religion department has broadened his understanding of Islam and Arab culture.

People

Larry Yarbrough

Pardon Tillinghast Professor of Religion

Adam Sawamura

Interviewer

 

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“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity.  In her interview, Barbara Ofosu-Somuah describes her life journey from Ghana, where she lived until she was nine, through her arrival in Middlebury as a member of Posse, and her discomfort with the sometimes circular assumptions from other Middlebury students that if you are black and a Posse scholar, then you are poor, not, if you are a Posse scholar, you are a leader. She also felt that as a black woman, she was an object of interest and at times her body was not her own, and in particular her hair was an object of interest. The ultimate question is, what does it mean to be a student of color at Middlebury?

Barbara Ofosu-Somuah

Middlebury Posse Scholar 2011

Watson fellow, 2013-2014

Will Nash

Professor of American Studies and English and American Literatures, Faculty co-Head, Wonnacott Commons

 

Interview Transcript

 

 

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity.  In her interview, Shirley Collado talks about growing up Dominican in New York city, the influence of her maternal grandmother and how the decision to be part of the Posse program and attend Vanderbilt University changed her life.

 

People

Shirley Collado

Dean of the College

Susan Burch

Associate Professor of American Studies; Director, CCSRE; Head of Life Stories project

 

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Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In her interview, Lydia Jun describes growing up in a Korean neighborhood in Los Angeles. She contrasts that experience with the reality at Middlebury College in terms of race and class.

 

Lydia Jun, Christopher DiOrio

 

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CCSRE Life Stories Project: Erin Fuller

Learn more about the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity  at Middlebury College.

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In her interview, Erin Fuller discusses attending college close to home, being a personal care assistant to a boy with autism, being a ski instructor for people with disabilities, pursuing her academic interest in disability studies, the differences in dorm life between boarding school and college, and how she plans to integrate these experiences in a medical profession.

People

Erin Fuller
Middlebury Class of 2011

Susan Burch
Associate Professor of American Studies; Director, CCSRE; Head of Life Stories project

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CCSRE Life Stories Project: Arthur Choo

Learn more about the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity  at Middlebury College.

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In his interview, Arthur Choo talks about the “global community” ideal in higher education, the experience of activism while being an ethnic minority, how an individual’s idea of race affects their perception of self, the effect of political correctness on classroom discussions, the humor of stereotypes, the difference between the ideal of diversity and the reality in the dining halls, combating the feeling of exclusivity in the Korean American Student Association, and the paradox of the success of minority students.

People

Arthur Choo
Sociology Major at Middlebury College

Susan Burch
Associate Professor of American Studies; Director, CCSRE; Head of Life Stories project

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CCSRE Life Stories Project: Claudia Cooper

Learn more about the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Middlebury College.

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In her interview, Claudia Cooper talk about teaching literature with Middlebury College students in Africa, her work in advocacy for community building to overcome AIDS, adopting a foreign-born child, and the feeling of difference at home and abroad.

People

Claudia Cooper
Visiting Assistant Professor of English & American Literature & Education Studies

Susan Burch
Associate Professor of American Studies; Director, CCSRE; Head of Life Stories project

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Framing and Blaming: The Role of Media in the 2005 Parisian Riots

Learn more about Political Science and Media Culture at Middlebury College.

The media played a significant role in the riots of Paris in 2005. This study examines the French and American media’s role in the formation of the identity of the rioters. The study draws on media content analysis based on news sources from the political right and left in each country. The results suggest two things. First, media on the political left, in both France and the United States, tends to frame the cause of the riots as a structural issue of exclusion while the political right tends to characterize the source of conflict as an agency issue of integration based on social differences. This can be explained by differences in political influences and underlying goals. Second, American media uses national and religious terms to describe the rioters’ identity while French media portrays them as a frustrated suburban youth. This reflects the respective historical contexts and political traditions.

People

Zoe Hamilton
Researcher

Erik Bleich
Sponsor & Associate Professor of Political Science

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Turkey maintains the image of a country bridging the divide between the Middle East and Europe; however, the continued prevalence of honor killings testifies to the difficulty in uprooting traditional patriarchal practices that remain widespread throughout the country. Although the Turkish government has enacted legal reforms – for instance, in 2002 and 2004 – aimed at eradicating the practice, new laws have been mostly ineffective and evidence indicates that both honor killings and the practice of “honor suicides” are actually increasing. My research explores this tension between secular government laws banning honor crimes and the continuation of honor killings within traditional and tribal communities. I argue that despite government efforts to educate the Turkish populace and institute legal reforms, the complex relationship between the cultural, patriarchal, and religious bases of honor killings makes it challenging to eradicate this practice in modern Turkish society.

People

Clara Rubin
Researcher

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