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A MiddLab Project

CCSRE Life Stories: Chris de la Cruz

Learn more about the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Middlebury College.

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In his interview,  Chris de la Cruz talks about growing up in Dayton, Ohio and his experience at Middlebury, where he has never felt that his ethnicity has been an issue in connecting with others on campus, how he relates to others has to do with a vibe and the search for home, and being with others who can elicit the feeling of home.

 

People

Chris de la Cruz

Paige Keren

 

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“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity.  In her interview, Shirley Collado talks about growing up Dominican in New York city, the influence of her maternal grandmother and how the decision to be part of the Posse program and attend Vanderbilt University changed her life.

 

People

Shirley Collado

Dean of the College

Susan Burch

Associate Professor of American Studies; Director, CCSRE; Head of Life Stories project

 

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Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In her interview, Lydia Jun describes growing up in a Korean neighborhood in Los Angeles. She contrasts that experience with the reality at Middlebury College in terms of race and class.

 

Lydia Jun, Christopher DiOrio

 

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Nuket Kardam is a professor in the Public Administration department at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Professor Kardam is from Turkey and is currently researching the identities of people in her country.  In this video, Professor Kardam talks about “Who is a Turk” and the findings from her ongoing research.

People

Nuket Kardam,
Public Administration Professor,
Monterey Institute of International Studies

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Nuket Kardam is a professor in the Public Administration department at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Professor Kardam is from Turkey and is currently researching the identities of people in her country.  In this video, Professor Kardam talks about “Who is a Turk” and the findings from her ongoing research.

It is impossible to understand a nation’s motivations and actions without being familiar with its national identity and the circumstances that shaped it. In the early twentieth century, Germany and Italy were both governed by authoritarian regimes that intertwined extreme nationalism with fascist ideology. After WWII, each nation faced the difficult task of redefining the political, social, and ethical terms of its national identity. We ask the question “How did Italy and Germany come to terms with their fascist past, and to what extent is the legacy of fascism still alive in national discourse?” Our research, which uses Italian, German and English sources, shows that despite underlying similarities, each nation has taken a different approach to integrating their fascist past into national identity. We look, for example, at how Hitler and Mussolini are differently remembered and the effect of their political and cultural legacies. The larger aim of this presentation is to show how, generally speaking, memory is a key factor in national identity.

People

Ashley Litzenberger
Mark Turpin
Researchers

Natasha Chang
Sponsor & Professor of Italian

Natalie Eppelsheimer
Sponsor & Assistant Professor of German

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This project examines the continued success of The Jerry Springer Show. Does the show promote the inclusion of the “other” in the American social order or is it a profit-seeking mechanism that proves only to further uphold a hierarchal American social structure in which some are excluded? By viewing scholarly articles on the talk show format, footage from The Jerry Springer Show, and other critical works in American Studies, I set out to prove that The Jerry Springer Show uses coded mechanisms to create the illusion of a democratic forum which promotes oppositional culture and challenges social norms. This, in turn creates a “participatory illusion” that veils the underlying profit-based motivations of the show. The goal is engaged viewers that question the motives of a seemingly un-refined format, “cheap amusements.” What is the show telling us about American society, and how is its shaping of perspective relevant to how we function as a society?

People

Carl Culicchia
Researcher

Michael Newbury
Sponsor & Professor of American Studies and English and American Literatures

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A MiddLab Project

CCSRE Life Stories Project: Ryan Kellett

Learn more about the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Middlebury College.

“Life Stories of Middlebury College” is a multi-phase initiative intended to gather people’s experiences while at the college, particularly reflections that highlight issues of diversity. In his interview, Ryan Kellett discusses issues of diversity he encountered growing up in San Francisco, his time studying and working in China, being part of a diverse group of students at the PALANA House, reflecting on work at Middlebury, and blogging.

People

Ryan Kellett
Interview Subject

Amy Rebecca Chin
Interviewer

Susan Burch
Associate Professor of American Studies; Director, CCSRE; Head of Life Stories project

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A MiddLab Project

Restorative Justice at Middlebury College

Learn more about Philosophy, Biology, Sociology & Anthropology and Justice at Middlebury College.

According to Howard Zehr (2002), “Restorative justice is a process to involve, to the extent possible, those who have a stake in a specific offense and to collectively identify and address harms, needs, and obligations, in order to heal and put things as right as possible.” We propose various methods of incorporating restorative practices into the Middlebury College judicial system.

People

Ben Manger ’11, Philosophy
Dana Callahan ’13, Biology
Matthew George ’12.5, Biology
Clayton Paschke ’13, Sociology
Researchers

Jon Kidde
Sponsor, Sociology & Anthropology

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A MiddLab Project

Chinese Interethnic Marriage: Passion or Rational Choice?

Learn more about Economics and Chinese at Middlebury College.

The One Child Policy (OCP) has had an enormous impact on Chinese society over the past thirty years and has further exacerbated the gender imbalance of the nation. The ensuing ?”marriage market shortages” in China have had important implications for marriageable-aged Chinese men and women. The scarcity of Han women in Chinese marriage markets and the concessions of the OCP with regard to ethnic minorities may increase the propensity of female Han to marry out when they see gains to marriage such as being able to have more than one child. Given this and other potential gains to intermarriage, under certain circumstances, interethnic marriage may be a rational choice for females in Chinese society.

People

Rachel Butera
Researcher

Thiery Warin
Thesis Advisor& Associate Professor of Economics

Hang Du
Second Reader & Assistant Professor of Chinese

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(click to enlarge)

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