Middlebury

MiddLab

Race Relations

A MiddLab Project

Framing and Blaming: The Role of Media in the 2005 Parisian Riots

Learn more about Political Science and Media Culture at Middlebury College.

The media played a significant role in the riots of Paris in 2005. This study examines the French and American media’s role in the formation of the identity of the rioters. The study draws on media content analysis based on news sources from the political right and left in each country. The results suggest two things. First, media on the political left, in both France and the United States, tends to frame the cause of the riots as a structural issue of exclusion while the political right tends to characterize the source of conflict as an agency issue of integration based on social differences. This can be explained by differences in political influences and underlying goals. Second, American media uses national and religious terms to describe the rioters’ identity while French media portrays them as a frustrated suburban youth. This reflects the respective historical contexts and political traditions.

People

Zoe Hamilton
Researcher

Erik Bleich
Sponsor & Associate Professor of Political Science

Related Links

Downloads

A MiddLab Project

Towards a Verified Middle East Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone

Learn more about Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Since 1995 there have been no forward-looking and realistic program of action to promote the goals of the 1995 Middle East Resolution. Remarkably, regional powers are yet to contemplate on concrete steps toward implementing the resolution due to complex security dynamics and daunting geopolitics that have stymied previous efforts for decades. A combination of regional challenges and opportunities to implement the 1995 Middle East Resolution provide reasons to revisit the concept of the zone and suggest next steps that could lead to progress. The paper concludes that peace and security are both sides of the same coin and suggests practical mechanisms; inter alia, the establishment of parallel processes between efforts to establish a WMDFZ and peaceful relations in the Middle East.

People

Foy Hubert
Researcher

Dr. Patricia Lewis
Supervisor

Interviews with Dr. Randy Rydell and Amb. Shaker I Mohammed

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones

Related Links

Downloads

October 21st- 29th will be the Fall Student Symposium, “American Poverty in Context.” We aim to build awareness and encourage discussion of poverty-related issues on the local and national level. The symposium will tackle issues such as hunger and local foods, social determinants of health, labor legislation, community action, and homelessness. In addition to inspiring intellectual discourse on poverty, we hope to motivate more students to participate in volunteer activities and to consider pursuing careers in non-profits.

Please click on the posters below in the downloads section for more detailed information about each event!

People

Joel Berg

Executive Director of the New York Coalition Against Hunger

Harlan Beckley

Director of the Shepherd Program for the Interdisciplinary Study of Poverty and Human Capability at Washington and Lee University

Robert Prasch

Middlebury College Professor of Economics

Samantha Marder

Project Manager, Project Health  Providence

Hannah Nichols

Talent and Technology Coordinator, Project Health National Offices

Hal Colston

Founder and Director of Good News Garage and Neighborskeepers

Doug Sinclair

Co-Founder of Middlebury Community Care Coalition

Ingrid Pixley

Property Manager for Addison County Community Trust

Jeanne Montross

Executive Director of HOPE (Helping Overcome Poverty’s Effects)

Yuan Lim

Student Organizer

Veronica Muoio

Student Organizer

Dan Murphy

Student Organizer

Related Links

Downloads

A MiddLab Project

Restorative Justice at Middlebury College

Learn more about Philosophy, Biology, Sociology & Anthropology and Justice at Middlebury College.

According to Howard Zehr (2002), “Restorative justice is a process to involve, to the extent possible, those who have a stake in a specific offense and to collectively identify and address harms, needs, and obligations, in order to heal and put things as right as possible.” We propose various methods of incorporating restorative practices into the Middlebury College judicial system.

People

Ben Manger ’11, Philosophy
Dana Callahan ’13, Biology
Matthew George ‘12.5, Biology
Clayton Paschke ’13, Sociology
Researchers

Jon Kidde
Sponsor, Sociology & Anthropology

Related Links

Downloads

A MiddLab Project

Chinese Interethnic Marriage: Passion or Rational Choice?

Learn more about Economics and Chinese at Middlebury College.

The One Child Policy (OCP) has had an enormous impact on Chinese society over the past thirty years and has further exacerbated the gender imbalance of the nation. The ensuing ?”marriage market shortages” in China have had important implications for marriageable-aged Chinese men and women. The scarcity of Han women in Chinese marriage markets and the concessions of the OCP with regard to ethnic minorities may increase the propensity of female Han to marry out when they see gains to marriage such as being able to have more than one child. Given this and other potential gains to intermarriage, under certain circumstances, interethnic marriage may be a rational choice for females in Chinese society.

People

Rachel Butera
Researcher

Thiery Warin
Thesis Advisor& Associate Professor of Economics

Hang Du
Second Reader & Assistant Professor of Chinese

marriate_rates
marriate_rates2

(click to enlarge)

Related Links

Downloads

A MiddLab Project

Hidden Cities: Locating Slums on the Globalized Map

Learn more about Geography at Middlebury College.

From the Spring 2010 issue of the student-published Middlebury Geographic magazine, Andrea Jones examines the economic and geographic conditions that lead to the creation of slums and shantytowns across three continents.

People

Andrea Jones
Author

Emily Allison
Photographer

hidden_cities

Related Links

Downloads

A MiddLab Project

Deconstructing Butter

Learn more about theatre and race at Middlebury College.

Can a fiction based upon a hoax tell us anything about who we are? “Spinning Into Butter” is a controversial and award-winning play, inspired by a racial incident that occurred while playwright Rebecca Gilman was a student at Middlebury in the early ’80s. On April 9th a multi-racial cast presented scenes from “Spinning Into Butter,” interspersed with audience reactions, to explore the script, its source material, and how we experience and respond to race at Middlebury in 2010.

People

Related Links

Downloads

Sites DOT Middlebury: the Middlebury site network.