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A MiddLab Project

The Nile Project at Middlebury College

The Nile Project at Middlebury College

Nile Project Aswan, Egypt, 8 March, 2014. Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis and Ethiopian American singer Meklit Hadero are joined by musicians who live along the world’s longest river for a boundary-crossing evening of new music. The Nile Project, inspired by Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Project, hopes to spread the musical traditions of the 11 countries touching the Nile, using music to raise awareness for the area’s environmental and cultural  challenges. The group’s first recording, Aswan, was named one of NPR’s Top Five Must-Hear International Albums of 2013. 

The Nile Project @ Middlebury>>

The Nile Project at Middlebury will consist of context-setting events in February and March 2015, and culminate in a residency and performance with by the artists in the first week of April.

February 20, Friday –  Kinobe: Music of Uganda >>
March 2-4, Monday-Wednesday – Residency by Dr. Sylvia Nannyonga-Tamusuza>>
March 30-April 2, Tuesday-Thursday – Residency by The Nile Project artists>>

 

Related Links

The Nile Project (official website)>>

Performing Arts Series event page>>

VIDEO: Aswan, a new album by the Nile Project>>

BBC Radio 3 follows The Nile Project in Aswan

NPR: 5 Must-hear International Albums (Aswan included)

The Nile Project on Facebook

The Nile Project on SoundCloud

Video


2012 Nile Project talk for TED Global featuring Meklit Hadero

Downloads

Water, Conflict, and Cooperation:
Lessons From the Nile River Basin 

The Nile Project – 2015

Collaborators/Contacts

 

Nile Background

The Nile River BasinThe Nile, one of the world’s most iconic rivers, has captivated the imagination of millions throughout time. Originating in two sources – Lake Victoria in East Africa and Lake Tana in the Ethiopian highlands – the 6,670-kilometer river flows northward through a diversity of climates, landscapes, and cultures before passing through Egypt and emptying into the Mediterranean Sea.Its 437 million inhabitants are projected to more than double within the next forty years, placing an ever increasing demand for Nile water; water that is tied to all aspects of life – from the food on tables to the electricity that powers homes to people’s health. Even now, people living along the Nile are vulnerable to water-related hardships. At least five nations in the Nile basin are facing water stress. Seven of the eleven Nile countries continue to suffer from undernourishment rates higher than 30%. Less than 10% of basin residents have access to electricity. The core issue at hand is how to peacefully allocate Nile Basin water among eleven nations with different needs and priorities, whose populations are all skyrocketing.This mounting resource scarcity has contributed to a geopolitical conflict between upstream and downstream riparian states. Tremendous political capital has been expended to draft the Nile Cooperative Framework Agreement, an international treaty to govern water distribution and infrastructure projects differently from the existing 1959 Egyptian-Sudanese treaty giving Egypt the majority water right annually. While the agreement has yet to win mutual consensus, the arduous negotiation process has exposed the deep-seated mistrust between countries, the absence of opportunities for citizen-led dialogue and the lack of a unified identity and vision for the future development of a shared Nile ecosystem.The Nile River Basin is wrought with political, environmental, economic, and social challenges requiring a new approach to better address the myriad challenges it faces. As regional tensions flare, the Nile Project offers a unique grassroots strategy to effectively mobilize thousands of people across the Nile Basin and beyond in constructive cross-cultural dialogue and collaboration. Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 11.02.34 AM

 

Funded in part by the Expeditions program of the New England Foundation for the Arts, made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional support from the six New England state arts agencies. Sponsored by the Performing Arts Series, with additional support from the Arts Council, Mahaney Center for the Arts, and the Department of Music. NileProjectWeb
In reaction to dance competition reality shows that evaluate who is qualified to dance, Big APE presents Everyone Can Dance, a community-based performance project that celebrates the contagious allure of movement and the dynamic capabilities of the human body. The project includes a statewide tour and a four-week residency with Middlebury College students and local community participants. The company held several open rehearsals so anyone could watch the performance take shape. Members of the company, as well as over 50 community members, suddenly appeared in front of the bank during Middlebury’s Chili Festival.  The High-Tech Hoedown was created by Tiffany Rhynard and members of the group.

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A MiddLab Project

Curricular Connections: Tamar Rogoff Performance Projects

Learn more about Neuroscience and the Arts at Middlebury College.

The interface between science and art is the core of this residency. Innovative choreographer and current Guggenheim Fellow Tamar Rogoff, and actor/dancer Gregg Mozgala share their findings from two years of daily work expanding the limitations and possibilities of cerebral palsy through dance. Three days of free classes and discussions culminate in the public, ticketed performance of Diagnosis of a Faun on October 29 and 30.

Video top right: CBS Sunday Morning story, original broadcast December 2009

Video bottom right: Audience members leaving the Friday night, October 29th performance were asked “If you could describe Diagnosis of a Faun in one word, what would it be?”  Responses were as varied as they were enlightening.

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